Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is My Name Is Pipsqueak! What’s Your Name? My True Story as told by Pipsqueak! the budgie and Cheri McAleese.

This is the story (so far) of Pipsqueak! the budgie. Pipsqueak! begins his story with his days at the pet store. He is brought home by Mommy, becomes a fantastic talker, plays games, performs tricks and brightens the lives of all who meet him. The book is told in Pipsqueak!’s voice and does a great job portraying how life looks from the budgie point of view. The appendix at the end has some great tips on how to care for (feeding, training, dealing with the occasional budgie nip) and bond with your budgie.

Cooper enjoyed this book. She thought Pipsqueak! is a terrific ambassador and spokesbird for budgies. She agrees with Pipsqueak! that budgies are brilliant birds and are capable of speaking in context (not just mimicry). Cooper’s favorite part of the book was when Pipsqueak! did loop the loops, as she is an expert at loop the loops, too.

Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is Extraordinary Chickens by Stephen Green-Armytage.

In honor of National Poultry Day, Cooper is reviewing Extraordinary Chickens. This is a book that showcases the beauty and amazing variety of the exotic chicken. There is some background on the bird and how the different strains came to be. There are also notes on the ornamental breeds featured in the book. But the beautiful photographs are the star of the show. 

Cooper had no idea there were so many types of chickens. Her favorites were the big fluffy birds. She also loved the gorgeous feather patterns of some of the chickens and the photos of the chicks. She highly recommends this book to bird lovers. It would make a great coffee table book and/or gift.Cooper thinks that chickens are indeed extraordinary. She also thinks that Extraordinary Budgies should be the author’s next book.

Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is The Blue Parakeet, by Margaret Gould.

The Blue Parakeet is short and sweet. And like the previous sentence, it is told in rhyme. Jingle lives with a family who loves him on Happy Times Street. Yet he wishes he could join the birds who fly outdoors. One day the window is left open and Jingle flies away. Jingle loves soaring with his new friends Picky and Pecky, but does not want to eat bugs and eventually grows tired of roaming. At the end of the day he returns home to his people, who are waiting for him at the door with his favorite treat.

This was a very cute, little (9 pages) book. Cooper loved the colorful illustrations (by Lorraine L. Arthur). She was glad that Jingle found his way home and did not have to eat bugs. Gross.

Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is The Budgie Said Grrrr! by Martin Waddell and Glenys Ambrus.bsg1Bill buys a little blue budgie at the bird shop. But the little budgie does not like bird seed. Grrrr! So it eats its bell, its mirror and its bird bath. Soon the budgie is getting bigger. Bill buys the budgie a bigger cage. Grrrr! The budgie eats a hat, PE gear, and a spare tire and gets even bigger. Soon it is so big that the budgie puts Bill, his mum and his dad in a huge budgie cage. Finally, Bill’s Mum makes the budgie something “good to eat”. Apple fruit cake, shortbread, chips, etc. seem to do the trick and Bill, his mum, his dad and the budgie live happily ever after. bsg2Cooper thought this story was a little odd. How can a budgie not like bird seed? She loved the illustrations and thought a budgie locking its people in a cage was hilarious. She was glad the budgie didn’t eat the postman. After eating the post man’s parcels and letters she was worried that he might be next. Cooper also thinks that feeding your budgie ice cream, cake, toffee apples, strawberry jelly, chips, sausages, hamburgers, honey buns and chocolate mousse is a very bad idea. Budgies should stick to fruits and vegetables, no matter how big they become.

Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is Feathers for Lunch by Lois Ehlert.f1In Feathers for Lunch, a cat slips out the door and goes on the prowl for a birdie lunch. Luckily, the bell on the cat’s collar warns the birds that danger is near.f2Cooper thought this book was a bit scary. But she was glad all the birds were able to fly away safely in the end.f3She liked the colorful illustrations. She thought the guide at the end of the book was a good way for young readers to learn about the different types of birds that might appear in their neighborhoods.

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Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is That Quail, Robert by Margaret Stanger.tqrCape Cod, 1962 – on finding an abandoned quail egg, Thomas and Mildred Kienzle bring it home. After washing and disinfecting it, they leave it on a counter as a decoration. Soon, Robert the quail emerges and becomes a cherished member of the family. The book is written by Margaret Stanger, their neighbor and quail sitter.

Robert’s antics and personality make her a local and later, national celebrity. Thousands of people would visit the Kienzle’s to meet Robert. From swallowing one of Mildred’s diamonds to taking a bath in the broccoli and cream sauce at a dinner party, Robert is always entertaining. Cooper thought this book was sweet and charming and thinks that we should adopt a quail or two.  Her favorite part of the book was when Robert proved she was female by laying an egg.

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Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is the bestseller, The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly by Sun-mi Hwang.henSprout is a caged hen whose dream is to live with the free range chickens and hatch one of her eggs. When she can no longer lay, the farmer and his wife decide to cull Sprout from the flock. Sprout manages to escape, but is shunned by the other farm animals.
The little hen ends up raising a chick (though not her own) and faces many challenges living life in the wild.

Cooper loved this little gem of a book. She admired Sprout for her bravery and for not giving up even when the odds were against her. She thought the book was touching, and while she teared up on occasion, she would highly recommend this wonderful story of acceptance, love and sacrifice.

Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is Beaky’s Guide to Caring for Your Birds by Isabel Thomas.book1Cooper thinks this is a great book for anyone considering a bird as a pet. It has information on choosing and cleaning a cage, what to feed (and not feed) your bird, handling your pet, etc. The book is filled with cute illustrations (by Rick Peterson) and photos. Some of the photos are by Cooper’s friend Karon Dubke. book2Cooper was excited to see Karon’s budgies, Bert and Ernie, in the book. She also liked that the book states that animal shelters and rescues are the best places to get new pets. Cooper agrees with the author that budgies need lots of toys – and that you don’t need to wait for your bird’s birthday to buy new ones!

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Cooper’s Book Report

This month’s book is Birdology by Sy Montgomery.birdologyIn Birdology, author and naturalist Sy Montgomery shines a light on the bird world. The book is divided into segments: chickens, cassowaries, hummingbirds, hawks, pigeons, parrots and crows. Montgomery combines science and storytelling in a way that makes for an entertaining read. Birdology not only shows us what fascinating creatures birds are, but reminds us how important they are to our world.

Cooper loved this book. She thought the author accurately portrayed the emotions, intelligence and abilities of her feathered friends. Her favorite part of the book was Montgomery’s green budgie, Jerry. He makes an appearance in the introduction. “Among the many things he showed me was that birds stir our souls in ways that change our lives.” Cooper thinks the author should have included a chapter about budgies. But maybe it would have been too difficult to cram the wonder of budgies into just one chapter. Surely, it would take an entire book for that. Budgieology

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